Month: February 2014

Queen at Tapac

Queen written by Sam Brooks and directed by Harry McNaughton is on at TAPAC from the 13th until the 16th of February. Having seen Queen in its previous season at The Basement, I was prepared for the unusual structure of the play, which is more like a series of stories that all revolve around the central theme of being a young gay guy right here, right now. I was also prepared to laugh heartily but to leave the theatre with red eyes and some serious shit to think about—and on this front, Queen delivered once again. This latest incarnation of Queen, directed by Harry McNaughton, is a slicker, more focused version of what came before. The cast of four has expanded to six and the lone female character has been rightfully cast out (this is the only time I will ever support the removal of a female character, but as there is no female voice written into Queen, having one female actor was simply confusing), giving the actors more opportunity both to interact and to …

Just Above the clouds at the basement theatre

Just Above The Clouds. People Who Play with Theatre. February 4th – 8th. The Basement Theatre. People Who Play with Theatre are presenting their original piece, Just Above the Clouds, for a return season at The Basement Theatre, Feb 4-8. Originally premiering as part of The Auckland Fringe 2013, Just Above the Clouds returns, reworked, to tell the story of “Boy” (Seamus Ford) taking to his “heart covered in concrete” with a pickaxe (Amanda Tito) to discover what’s inside – “Girl” who “knows everything” (Jess Sayer). Written and directed by Ben Andersen, the piece opens with an acapella soundscape (which continued throughout) and paper lanterns floating, like clouds, in the darkness. Lights come up and one cannot help but be struck by the impressive set, co-designed by Andersen and Britney Pilling; towers of banana boxes offset by a cubist-inspired cardboard tree and sun. The set worked beautifully, allowing reconfiguration of the space at a moment’s notice, a device that could have been further exploited. The ensemble’s movement around the set allowed us to be dazzled …