Month: December 2014

Alain Badiou, live at the Fisher & Paykell Appliances Auditorium

Figure 1: Drawing of Badiou. #tupacaput I sat in the middle of the Fisher & Paykell Appliances Auditorium, half wanting to catch the man himself, and half wanting to witness the spectacle around him. Searching the crowd, I saw artists, writers, activists and poets, all of whom had come to see “the greatest living Philosopher”, Alain Badiou. A flurry of whispers and shrill excitement had preceded Badiou’s visit. In the metaphorical “tea cup” of Auckland’s intellectual community, a storm was brewing. Badiou had invaded my news feed and was competing with inane pictures of pugs, the two entities, momentarily taking on an equivalency. In the Auditorium, the crowd began to hush and prepare itself for the Philosopher. When Badiou entered, he came flanked by two Professors of the University of Auckland, an honor guard for the luminary’s passage through the Owen G. Glenn Building. The silver-haired Philosopher wore a functional outfit; his polo embellished with a simple white collar. Badiou’s pants had large military-style pockets, filled presumably with the articles of academic labor. His belly was spherical, …

WWLD? In Conversation with Leafa Wilson aka Olga Krause

WW..D? Is an interview segment where we get to know awesome people that are a part of the creative community in New Zealand. This week we spoke to curator Leafa Wilson aka Olga Krause, of Waikato Museum. As well as being a curator Leafa is an artist with a very multifaceted practice. Read more for What Would Leafa Do? You are the Curator of Art at Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato. Working within a national institution, how do you balance your own curatorial motivations with those of the institute? I’m not sure if it is possible to balance my own curatorial motivations, and I say this purely because I work in a regional museum which has a number of criteria to which I am subject to. Museums or galleries that are funded by local government have a responsibility to serve the needs of the public (stakeholders in museum-speak) and therefore I do feel an obligation to the people to try to curate exhibitions that involve them somehow or other as well as endeavouring to make it as curatorially …

Making Visible at Franklin Arts Centre

Still Making Visible There are many blindspots in New Zealand’s acknowledgement of the Pacific. Overlooking the hard work of labourers, intrumental in the daily operation of this land we call home, is nothing new. A long standing premise for Pacific artists, Making Visible curated by Ioana Gordon-Smith is another take on this well researched area. Knowing this show would be in an unexplored gallery; Franklin Arts Centre, in farming suburb Pukekohe, left little excitement. It’s too easy for exhibitions to be plonked into these spaces with no audience ever being considered. And it’s too easy for the curators not to give a damn. Portfolio building I call it. However determined to make the 1hour+ drive, curator Ioana Gordon-Smith quickly proved me wrong. The power of curation is a beautiful thing. Teaming up established artists with younger ones, academically focused versus practice orientated, the artist selection was flawless. Adding to this was the variation of media. Large wall works were interupted by larger scultpural works, the entire space was utilised. It was slick and compelling. Salome Tanuvasa …