Year: 2014

Just Above the clouds at the basement theatre

Just Above The Clouds. People Who Play with Theatre. February 4th – 8th. The Basement Theatre. People Who Play with Theatre are presenting their original piece, Just Above the Clouds, for a return season at The Basement Theatre, Feb 4-8. Originally premiering as part of The Auckland Fringe 2013, Just Above the Clouds returns, reworked, to tell the story of “Boy” (Seamus Ford) taking to his “heart covered in concrete” with a pickaxe (Amanda Tito) to discover what’s inside – “Girl” who “knows everything” (Jess Sayer). Written and directed by Ben Andersen, the piece opens with an acapella soundscape (which continued throughout) and paper lanterns floating, like clouds, in the darkness. Lights come up and one cannot help but be struck by the impressive set, co-designed by Andersen and Britney Pilling; towers of banana boxes offset by a cubist-inspired cardboard tree and sun. The set worked beautifully, allowing reconfiguration of the space at a moment’s notice, a device that could have been further exploited. The ensemble’s movement around the set allowed us to be dazzled …

Riding in Cars with (mostly straight) boys at The Basement Theatre car park

Riding in Cars with (Mostly Straight) Boys. Sam Brooks. 6 – 15 Feb. The Basement Theatre car park. As the title would suggest, Riding in Cars with (Mostly Straight) Boys (written and directed by Sam Brooks) revolves around a car and its passengers, namely Kyle (our protagonist) and his slew of unattainable crushes (the ‘mostly straight boys’). Kyle is stuck on his learner’s license and the boys who will only ever give him a ride home. The action takes place in The Basement Theatre car park (the Wellington season will see Te Papa’s waterfront walkway put to good use), with the audience clustered around the car, eagerly hanging onto every last witticism and cringe-worthy confession. Brooks’ script moves at 100 kph, gliding effortlessly between the lanes of heart-wrenching drama and laugh-out-loud romantic comedy, never losing any poignancy in the journey. The decision to centre the action on the dialogue between driver and passenger gives us insight into Kyle’s world of falling for the unattainable in a way that will strike a universal chord among audiences, …