All posts filed under: Interviews

WWLD? In Conversation with Leilani Kake

WW..D? Is an interview segment where we get to know awesome people that are a part of the creative community in New Zealand. This week we spoke to Leilani Kake – artist, educator and gallery coordinator for Papakura Art Gallery. Leilani is a powerful film maker, mother and activist, whose work imbues sophisticated questioning about our own perceived ideas. Read more for What Would Leilani Do?  From reaching visual arts in tertiary institutions and also high schools to now being a gallery coordinator must have been a big change, what are some of the new challenges you face you as the Papakura Gallery coordinator? Having teaching experience in both secondary and tertiary sectors has been hugely beneficial in my new role as a gallery coordinator. I am able to communicate with people from all walks of life. My main challenge is breaking down stereotypes that people have of art galleries and gallery coordinators. That only a certain “type” of person can enter or have an opinion on art and that were snobby. I’m far from that model!  What have been …

WWKD? In Conversation with Karl Bayly

WW..D? Is an interview segment where we get to know awesome people that are a part of the creative community in New Zealand. This week we spoke to  Karl Bayly – curator and gallerist of PILOT, Free Parking Space Project and Casbah. Based in Hamilton, Karl is a key player in the vitalisation of the local art landscape. Read more for What Would Karl Do? Within only a few years you have become integral to the Hamilton art community. What is the current state of Hamilton arts and what needs to happen? Its been rather bleak of late. You could name the galleries on one hand for awhile, and probably still could. For a small city, Hamilton has lots of artists and creative people here, but limited spaces in which to participate in. I don’t think Hamilton has established itself yet as an attractive city for artists to come to work in. When I moved back to Hamilton at the beginning of 2013 I think the only gallery not associated with an institution was Draw Inc, which stood alone for at least …

WWVD? In Conversation with Vinesh Kumaran

WW..D? Is an interview segment where we get to know awesome people that are a part of the creative community in New Zealand. This week we spoke to freelance photographer Vinesh Kumaran. Vinesh works both as a commercial photographer and as a photographer in a freelance capacity for artists. Read more for What Would Vinesh Do? How long have you been a freelance photographer and how did it all begin? In my final year in the Bachelor of Visual Arts at Manukau Institute of Technology, we had a guest speaker come in to talk about commercial photography. It was there I discovered what commercial/advertising photography was and the role of the photographer’s assistant. I realized this was what I wanted to do. I started working in the photography industry straight after art school – so since 2004. At first I was working as a photographer’s assistant for about 8 years. Within the last two years I have been freelancing as an independent photographer shooting for my own clients. What does the day of a freelance photographer look like? …

WWID? In Conversation with Ioana Gordon-Smith

WW..D? Is an interview segment where we get to know awesome people that are a part of the creative community in New Zealand. This week we spoke to curator Ioana Gordon-Smith, of Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery. Before her time at Te Uru Ioana was the curator of Object Space and the Artspace Tautai Education intern. Read more for What Would Ioana Do? Your career consists of both independent and institutional curation. How do you balance your own curatorial motivations within an institution?  There are projects where I’ll take a leading role and others where it’s more about facilitation. I like that though, because it means I get to be involved, in some capacity, with a wide range of projects that go beyond what I would have thought up on my own. A key difference working within an institution though is a bigger responsibility to the public, whereas I probably have a much narrower group of people in mind when curating independently. Wall texts, labels and opening hours become more of a factor. What are your curatorial motivations? My …

WWLD? In Conversation with Leafa Wilson aka Olga Krause

WW..D? Is an interview segment where we get to know awesome people that are a part of the creative community in New Zealand. This week we spoke to curator Leafa Wilson aka Olga Krause, of Waikato Museum. As well as being a curator Leafa is an artist with a very multifaceted practice. Read more for What Would Leafa Do? You are the Curator of Art at Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato. Working within a national institution, how do you balance your own curatorial motivations with those of the institute? I’m not sure if it is possible to balance my own curatorial motivations, and I say this purely because I work in a regional museum which has a number of criteria to which I am subject to. Museums or galleries that are funded by local government have a responsibility to serve the needs of the public (stakeholders in museum-speak) and therefore I do feel an obligation to the people to try to curate exhibitions that involve them somehow or other as well as endeavouring to make it as curatorially …

WWMD? In Conversation with Mark Amery

WW..D? Is an interview segment where we get to know awesome people that are a part of the creative community in New Zealand. This week we spoke to curator Mark Amery, of Letting Space. As well as being a curator Mark has been an instrumental art writer over a wide variety of platforms. Read more for What Would Mark Do? How did you first get into the art industry and how has that developed over time? Back in the day: through music and alternative media. All I ever wanted as a teen in the 80s hanging out in K Road and back in suburbia was to play music on bFM, really. With an interest across music, art and theatre I got really excited when I got involved in radio and then in an independent crossartform art mag Stamp in all the things my contemporaries were doing – thinking about it through discussion and commentary felt important. That led to a lot of work as a radio and print arts producer and editor, and amongst it the interesting arts community crosspollination that …

WWED? In Conversation with Ema Tavola

WW..D? Is an interview segment where we get to know awesome people that are a part of the creative community in New Zealand. This week we spoke to curator Ema Tavola, of PIMPI (Pacific Island Management, Production + Ideas). She was an instrumental figure for Fresh Gallery Otara, Associate Curator for HomeAKL and major advocate for Pacific arts. Read more for What Would Ema Do? How did you first get into the art industry? When I lived in Suva, I got involved with the Oceania Centre for Arts, Culture and Pacific Studies at the University of the South Pacific. I started painting there and discussing Oceania and art making with the late Professor ‘Epeli Hau’ofa. It was there that I participated in a painting workshop with the New Zealand Niuean artist and writer, John Pule, who told me about Manukau School of Visual Arts (now MIT Faculty of Creative Arts) in Otara, and that’s where I ended up studying. I moved to Auckland and lived with friends in Central Auckland in 2001 before moving to Manukau to study full-time. From those Fiji mates, I …

WWTD: In Conversation with Talia Smith

WW..D? Is an interview segment where we get to know awesome people that are part of the create community in New Zealand. This week we spoke to artist, curator and writer Talia Smith who is currently on a 6 month curatorial residency at Gaffa in Sydney. Read more for What Would Describe yourself in 3 words. Crazy, sexy, cool – I’m sorry I couldn’t help it. Actual words I would choose: Driven, foolish and funny. If you were a mythical creature what would you be? The Loch Ness monster Tell us about your practice. My photographic and video practice examines the marks and traces left from human interaction on spaces and landscape. I mainly focus on everyday spaces that we often take for granted and drive past each day without taking notice. This is something that I have been interested in for a long time, on long drives to and from New Plymouth to Auckland we would pass through small towns and industrial areas and I would always wonder what ever happened to these places? What …

WWTD: In conversation with Tracey Williams

WW..D? Is a monthly interview segment where we get to know awesome people that are part of the create community in New Zealand. This month we spoke to senior arts and culture programme leader from Auckland Council Tracey Williams. Read more for What Would Tracey Do? How long have you been working for the arts and culture team in Auckland council? I’ve been working for Auckland Council’s Arts and Culture Unit since January 2011; first as the manager of Papakura Art Gallery and from March 2013 (following a restructure) in my current role as senior arts and culture programme leader. What does a senior arts and culture programmer do? My job description says my role is a senior creative position in the curatorial team that develops the strategic regional arts and culture programme in the context of the Auckland Plan, covering all disciplines and audiences, including public art, (within and outside Council’s facilities) and delivery channels (for example, exhibitions, festivals, events, pop up programmes, seminars, classes et al). I have a regional role with a …